I strongly believe genealogical research should be sourced... whether we are putting information on the web or taking it off the web. If you use any of my material in your own records, please cite the source - it will benefit both you and anyone else who reads your info to know where you obtained data.

Consider this ... how can someone determine how reliable your info is unless they know the source? My family lines all tie to Fork Ridge, Marshall County, West Virginia, the closer they get to me. From 1835 when Marshall County was formed to 1863 when West Virginia became a state, it was Marshall County, Virginia. Too many family trees I've seen on Ancestry.com incorrectly include my ancestors with a location of "Marshall, Buckingham, Virginia, USA," which refers to Buckingham County, VA, not Marshall County, WV. As soon as I see one of those trees, I tend to doubt its integrity, suspecting that the owner has absorbed info from other trees without any research to determine accuracy. The point I want to emphasize here: A tree that is well-sourced can provide valuable clues and actually lead a "distant cousin" to your genealogy doorstep.

While I am by no means an expert on the subject, there are numerous methods of creating source citations, and I'm simply asking that you cite material you take from this website in some format. A few thoughts/suggestions ...


To cite this website in general:

Jo Ellen (Kuhn) Dalton, West Virginia Heritage (online http://www.wv-heritage.com), viewed 09 September 2015).


To cite one of my images:

Jo Ellen (Kuhn) Dalton, "Photograph of Herbert Samuel Kuhn" digital image, West Virginia Heritage (online http://www.wv-heritage.com/p9.htm), viewed 09 September 2015). Digital scan of original photograph owned by Nancy Logsdon made in 2006 by Dalton.

A word of advice on citing a URL for the images: notice the file reference in the example above ends with p9.htm - that is the page for Herbert Kuhn's narrative page. If you look at the URL on one of the images pages, they end with something like e434.htm. Be aware that the "e" file names can change when the web cite is updated - but the "p" file names will always stay the same for each person. That is the reason I recommend citing the link for a person's narrative page - it will always contain a link to the photograph you are referencing.


One might think of the various sections of the website as chapters in the book:

Jo Ellen (Kuhn) Dalton, "Fork Ridge Christian Church Cemetery," West Virginia Heritage (online http://www.wv-heritage.com), viewed 09 September 2015).


Should you wish to cite something more specific, this approach is suggested:

Jo Ellen (Kuhn) Dalton, West Virginia Heritage (online http://www.wv-heritage.com), viewed 09 September 2015), marriage anecdote from Herbert Samuel Kuhn biography.


Please include credit for the initial author when I have used someone else's original research and conclusions:

Jo Ellen (Kuhn) Dalton, West Virginia Heritage (online http://www.wv-heritage.com), viewed 09 September 2015), Nikolaus Kuhn biography citing research from History of Kuhn/Dittmeier/Ganz Families, Kathryne (Kuhn) Krouse, compiler, 1996.




Thanks to Diana Powell and Faye West for the format and wording of portions of this page.